Archive for July, 2011

Glute-Ham Raise Regression

Posted in Z.S. Basketball Training, Z.S. Tennis, Z.S. Training with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 23, 2011 by zenithstrength

If you are an athlete who is interested in getting faster and more explosive you need to add glute ham raises in your training program if you’re not doing so already.

Glute-ham raises are fantastic for training the posterior chain which is usually lacking in many people and developing hamstring and hip extension strength which is important if your focus is on improving speed and quickness.

The problem is that the glute ham raise is very hard to perform. Most people won’t be able to complete reps without severely arching their backs using lumbar extension instead of hip extension, definitely not something you want to do if you would like to keep your low back healthy and pain-free.

Mike Robertson has a great instructional video on how to perform the glute ham raise correctly.

We came up with a glute ham regression using the pull up revolution pro, which deloads the body on the eccentric portion so the athlete can achieve full hip extension and also  assists the client for the concentric portion so that the athlete can work on maintaining neutral spine.

Daniel demonstrates the glute ham raise regression below:

Once the athlete can perform a couple sets of 6-8 reps with solid form, we gradually reduce the band assistance and will eventually progress to loading them with chains.

Another benefit to improving strength through glute ham raises is that it transfers over to improving the deadlift and squat.

Mike Robertson has an article about this you can check out here.

If your goal is improve your explosiveness or you would like to improve strength by lifting heavier stuff, give this regression a try and then start progressing and improving your strength.

Train Hard!

Shyam

Advertisements

Overhead drill with a Twist.

Posted in Z.S. Tennis with tags , , , , , , , , on July 14, 2011 by zenithstrength

At Zenith Strength we are constantly thinking about ways to get more creative to help our athletes improve.

My brother who is a tennis coach mentioned that most players have issues with the proper footwork for the overhead.

After watching some of Eric Cressey’s med ball drills that he does with his pitchers, I came up with a variation for our tennis players.

 

In the video below, David Hsu is working on his cross over step as it relates to the overhead, drops back and throws a weighted 12oz med ball to work strengthening and  his motion and developing more force. The ball weighs slightly more than the average tennis racket is about the size of a baseball. You can get these at power-systems

We generally do this after some band resisted cross over steps to take advantage of the neuro muscular stimulus the band tension provides.

Train Hard!

Shyam

 

Assessing the Basketball Player

Posted in Uncategorized, Z.S. Basketball Training, Z.S. Training with tags , , , , , , , , on July 11, 2011 by zenithstrength

Assessments and corrective exercise are extremely important factor in designing a strength and conditioning program. It doesn’t matter the sport you play or the goals you have. The coach needs to have an idea on how you well you move and the easiest way to do that is with a few exercises. Before we get started, I highly recommend Assess and Correct from Eric Cressey, Mike Robertson, and Bill Hartman. A&C is great as it will improve your ability to assess clients and athletes. There are also corrective exercises with progressions to improve movement issues and you can add them into your dynamic warmup.

Regarding basketball athletes there are a few things we look at that  basketball players usually have some restrictions with

1.Ankle Mobility

2.Hip Mobility and stability

3.Previous injury history

Keep in mind that I am generalizing and that not everyone who plays basketball will have  these issues which is why it is preferable to thoroughly assess the athlete prior to training them.

Ankle restrictions and lack of dorsiflexion is very common amongst basketball players and this can occur for many reasons such as type of footwear  worn, using ankle braces while practicing, and/or  due to sprained ankles.

Eric Cressey also has a great article on the importance of ankle mobility you should also check out.

We also take a look to see if there are soft tissue restrictions in the calf and soleus that may be inhibiting ankle movement and if there are we address that by using some SMR techniques with a lacrosse ball or stick. If that doesn’t work we will refer out for soft tissue work.

Here are a couple of ankle mobility drills we use for the ankle. Keep in mind that there are endless variations of mobility drills out there.

I learned this from KStarr  and have been using this for a while now and have been seeing a lot improvement with our athletes. Check out Mobility wod for some innovative mobility drills.

I like this set up with the band just above the malleolus as it allows the ankle to glide from the band distraction.

Calf stretch using the pro stretch.

I highly recommend this if you don’t have one as it the best way to stretch out your gastroc. The prostretch also works well for plantar fascitis and other foot issues too.  

Hip Mobility can be an issue for basketball players. Generally speaking from the players we have assessed hip flexors both the Psoas and Rectus Femoris will be short and stiff. The Thomas test is a good way to test hip flexor shortness.

Below is a detailed explanation of the Thomas test and what to  look for.

We also check hip strength/stability using the overhead squat and single leg squat test.

You can also use the step down test to see if the knee caves in. Hip stability is extremely important regarding knee health and is a key component in our program design to prevent ACL injuries.

And lastly we take down the athletes injury history because the strongest indicator of an injury is a previous injury to the same spot. By assessing the athlete and addressing the needs of the athlete and improving movement patterns our goal is to reduce the likelihood of a serious injury so the athlete can reach their performance goals on the court.

Tran Hard.

Shyam