Archive for Avery Faigenbaum

Strength Training for Youth Athletes Part 1

Posted in Z.S. Basketball Training, Z.S. Tennis, Z.S. Training with tags , , , , , , , on September 7, 2012 by zenithstrength

Our goal as coaches/trainers is to educate and obliterate the myths that exist in our industry pertaining to training specific populations, proper nutrition habits and teaching proper lifting mechanics.

Since most of our clients are athletes , the focus is on educating parents on the benefits of strength training for youth athletes and dispelling the myths that still exist regarding training this population.

Myth #1:  Strength training will stunt my son’s/daughter’s growth.

This belief has been around since the 70’s and funnily enough I remember worrying about the consequences when I first started lifting weights. It wasn’t until I attended a conference early in my career and heard Dr. Avery Faigenbaum present that I had anecdotal studies to prove that this myth was indeed just that.

Strength training can come in many forms but when most parents talk about it they are usually referring to their child lifting heavy weights. It’s also difficult for coaches to ease parent’s concerns when they have been exposed to watching gymnastics during the Olympics, seeing muscular athletes perform ridiculous feats of strength who also happen to be on the shorter side.

In fact, the original study came out in the 70’s in Japan, when researchers noticed that there was a correlation between the youth laborers moving heavy objects and their short stature. They essentially attributed the short statures of the kids with lifting heavy “stuff” and concluded that lifting heavy objects stunted a child’s growth. Unfortunately this myth has grown into coaches, pediatricians and other medical proponents preaching that kids don’t get stronger lifting weights and they are probably going to hurt themselves.

Luckily more studies have been published refuting the notion that lifting weights is dangerous and citing the benefits of strength training including this one by Beringer et  al. (2010). According to the New York Times article, the study was very comprehensive covering 60 years of collected data with boys and girl ages 6 to 18.They concluded that children and adolescents benefited from weight training but, maturity had a role in improved strength gains. However, there wasn’t a noticeable boost of strength during puberty which was surprising since the gains were linear for different ages groups participating in a strength program.

Furthermore, Dr. Avery Faigenbaum has been a huge in producing research, articles and books on the safety of strength training for kids. His website StrongKid.com is full of research based evidence of the benefits of weight lifting.

So, what does this all mean?

All the research and proof is great but ultimately, parents are paying coaches for results so proper programming is key. The coach needs to use appropriate progressions and often times that means starting out with a lot of bodyweight movements such as squats, hip hinges, lunges, bear crawls, and in many cases regressing movements such as push ups and pull-ups. In addition, younger athletes (6-10) should be involved in more discovery and play sessions. I see too many coaches who train little kids like they are young adults and I’ll admit that I have been guilty of that in the past. Discovering movement is essential for motor development and as kids age and demonstrate proper movement patterns you can begin to appropriately load them with med balls, bands or other forms of external resistance.

If the result of training is to produce faster, quicker, stronger athletes strength training principles must be used to increase force production. Make sure appropriate loads are used and that the athletes clearly demonstrate the ability to perform the body weight variations of the movements.

In part 2 we will go over progressions for a few of the lifts once the child masters  the basic movement patterns.

References:

Michael Behringer, Andreas vom Heede, ,Zengyuan Yue, et al. The Effects of Resitance Training in Children and Adolocents: A Meta Analysis, Pediatrics Vol. 126 No. 5 November 1, 2010  pp. e1199 -e1210  (doi: 10.1542/peds.2010-0445)

Gretchen Reynolds, (Nov 2010). Phy ED: The Benefits of Weight Training for Children. NY Times.
Retrieved from  http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/24/phys-ed-the-benefits-of-weight-training-for-kids/